How do you check the health of your pipeline?

    I’ll add a few questions that are somewhat different like:

    Question1:

    If something were to make the deal go south, what would it be?

    Question2:

    What questions/issues does the prospect keep asking about?

    Question3:

    What question should you ask the prospect or buying team, that you just haven’t asked?

    Could you share an example of great outreach that you’ve received? Why did it stand out?

    “Hi Nancy,

    After poking around your site, I noticed you’re using XYZ Mkt software. They are a great vendor when starting your email program but we find that companies often outgrow their level of support and functionality.

    At ABC corp, we help over 150,000 growing businesses address some of the following questions:
    How can I spend less time managing email?
    How can I ensure my emails aren’t going to spam folders?
    What ways can I drive more revenue from my marketing efforts?
    If any of these questions resonate with you, it would be great to chat through some strategies that can help. What’s the best way to get some time on your calendar?”

    Let’s break it down…

    After poking around your site, I noticed you’re using XYZ Mkt software. OK, you’ve offered proof that you actually did go to my site and there is a valid reason for your outreach.

    They are a great vendor when starting your email program but we find that companies often outgrow their level of support and functionality. Complimented my decision, and legitimately pointed out why it might be time to consider something else.

    At ABC corp, we help over 150,000 growing businesses address some of the following questions: Established credibility without making the email too much about them.

    How can I spend less time managing email?
    How can I ensure my emails aren’t going to spam folders?
    What ways can I drive more revenue from my marketing efforts? These questions offer value [what should I be asking myself] at the same time, it builds curiosity for their solution.

    If any of these questions resonate with you, it would be great to chat through some strategies that can help. What’s the best way to get some time on your calendar? Good call-to-action, and doesn’t put the onus on me to click on their calendar.

    Could you share an example of bad outreach that you’ve received? What was done wrong?

    “Thank you for connecting back to me, Nancy! I see that you’re the Founder at Smart Selling Tools Inc.. If you are open to taking a look, I have something revolutionary to share with you. We’ve developed an artificial intelligence software that syncs with your LinkedIn account. It helps you identify your exact target audience, connect with others in your industry, and generates daily qualified leads in a significant way. I only work with Management Consulting companies because I know your audience and understand what you need. Would you be interested in setting up a quick demo with our Director so we can show you how the software works? If you like what you see, we’ll even set up your campaigns for free, no strings attached. Thoughts? -Jassie”

    My response: Don’t fake your way to personalization. This LinkedIn message smacks of the bare minimum effort. The ‘Inc.’ after my company name tells me it was grabbed from my profile. Even worse, is that she mentions she only works with Management Consulting companies. That is the category I’m under on LinkedIn because nothing fits better, but it is not what I do. In addition, the message was sent to me immediately after I accepted her LinkedIn invitation.

    Don’t follow this formula:
    1) invite to connect
    2) pitch
    3) use the ‘fields’ from LinkedIn in your template.

    Do follow this formula:
    1) view my website
    2) find out what I do and what I would be interested in
    3) invite me on LinkedIn
    4) don’t pitch me as a prospective client because I am not
    5) say, “I know you’re an expert on sales technology. We have a solution we thought you’re audience would be interested in knowing about. Would it be possible for us to give you a demo and get your thoughts?”

    It never ceases to amaze me how salespeople are so willing to go after companies/contacts who aren’t real prospects. In this case, I have a feeling they used their own software to identify their ‘exact target audience.’ Remember this if you’re in sales, “Don’t send marketing campaigns – you are not in marketing. Instead, talk to people authentically with personalized messages.” Leave the marketing to marketers.

    How to enable rapid revenue recovery for B2B Sales in a changed world?

    The advice I’ll give is not much different from the advice I gave before the pandemic. That’s because there are golden rules to follow when it comes to deploying the right sales technology and they don’t change.
    You want to get the most from the solutions you currently use, and you’re assigning resources on things that will have the greatest impact on hitting the number.

    The first thing you want to do is understand your current use of technology.

    • What software does your organization currently have subscriptions to?
    • Who are those licenses assigned to (salespeople, sales ops, sales leaders, etc)
    • What is the rate of adoption of those solutions?
    • What impact are the solutions having on your business? How do you know? How are you measuring the impact?
    • Are there opportunities for consolidation? Can you expand the use of one solution to eliminate the need for another solution.

    The second thing you can do to ensure you hit your numbers is to make sure you’re set up to solve the right challenges with technology. Many companies subscribe to the philosophy of “CRM and Done” meaning CRM should be all sellers need.
    But CRM doesn’t help reps find the best content to use for an opportunity. CRM doesn’t help you create effective proposals or presentations. CRM doesn’t help you coach your team, or help your team learn from each other. To find solutions that address revenue-impacting challenges, ask yourself the following questions:

    • Are we calling on the best prospects (those that have the highest propensity to purchase?)
    • Do sellers have a system to get in touch with the best prospects through best-practice email and voicemail sequences?
    • Are we able to quantify and communicate value effectively to each of the buyer types we sell to?
    • What are the activities or circumstances that prevent us from selling more?

    To help find technologies that address revenue challenges, you can view our newly released, Top Sales Tools of 2020 guide or view free resources on the Smart Selling Tools site.

    What’s the effect of COVID-19 Outbreak on sales?

    Email has always been an important communication medium and it’s even more important now that your prospects are working from home. Make sure your sellers have a way to set up email sequences to reach more prospects. While you’re at it, give them a way to access and update Salesforce records from within their email account. Providing these tools will show that you’re doing your part to help your salespeople be as productive as possible during this difficult time. It’s an investment that will deliver dividends well beyond this difficult period.

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